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CALENDAR of EVENTS 2013

 

Demonstrations -

 

blacksmith Joe


Blacksmithing

 

Joe Meltreder returns this summer to demonstrate the tools and techniques of his trade each Wednesday and Sunday from 2-5 p.m. during July and August.   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 


woodturningWoodturning

Woodturning demonstrations will be featured again this summer in the Museum Barn at 112 Perkins Street.  Trustee Temple Blackwood, a local woodturner with four decades of commercial woodturning and teaching experience, will demonstrate his craft on Wednesdays and Sundays from 2-5 p.m. in July and August.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

onion basketsWatercolor Painting
Basket Making

Elise Andréa,
watercolorist, basket maker, author and instructor
will demonstrate watercolor painting and basket making
each Wednesday and Sunday, 2-5 p.m. during July & August.

She will offer a foundational watercolor class on Sunday, July 7th 2-4 p.m.
and again on Sunday, August 4th 2-4 p.m. She will also offer an ongoing plein air class every Monday mornings, 9:30 – 11:30 beginning July 8th.

watercolor sceneBasket making classes will be offered every other
Wednesday from 2-4 p.m. in July and August
beginning July 10th.

All classes will be $35 per person per class.
Call 326-9247 or email info@wilsonmuseum.org
to pre-register and receive a materials list.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


chair caningChair Seat Weaving

Weaving chair seats including caning, wide binder, shaker tape and other styles will be demonstrated in the Museum Barn at 112 Perkins Street by Harold & Audrey Johnson on Wednesday, August 14th from 2-5 p.m. The couple not only shares their expertise with others, they sell recaned rockers and side chairs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exhibits -

 

Seven under Par: A Collection of Jigsaw Puzzles

This season the Wilson Museum is pleased to show seven Par puzzles, on loan, collected by the late Ellenore Wilson Doudiet, daughter of Wilson Museum's founder Dr. J. Howard Wilson. Par Company, Ltd., considered the Rolls-Royce of jigsaw puzzles, was founded in 1931. The name Par comes from the "par time" it takes to assemble a given puzzle and Par puzzles have the time stamped on the outside of the box. With their non-interlocking and unusually shaped pieces (some crafted into the intitials of the puzzle purchaser), it is often very difficult to make par, let alone go under par. In addition to the exhibit on display from May 27th through September 30th in the main hall of the Museum, there will be a special two-part presentation on June 26th by Anne Williams and Rosamond Rea.

 

Tea with Hannah

Hannah's tea setHannah Atkins Avery was born in Truro, Massachusetts on Cape Cod, the daughter of Nathaniel and Mary Staples Atkins and was married in 1779 to Thatcher Avery, the son of Job Avery. Thatcher and Hannah's first two children, Hannah and Mary, were born in Truro as well, but were soon brought to what is now North Castine to the house that would become Hannah's home for the remainder of her life. A portrait of Hannah, reverse painting on glass, provides a visual picture of this determined woman who raised a total of eleven children through the tumultuous Revolutionary and Nation-Building eras.

In a letter from historian Hosea Wardwell to Charles Noyes in 1911:
"Among the valuable relics in the family which have descended to these times is a set of china, with the monogram of Major Avery and wife on each piece. Also the old-style cups which were used by the British officers."

Some of the monogrammed china tea set have indeed come down through the family and are recent gifts to the Museum. The exhibit Tea with Hannah, including the tea set and portrait, can be seen in the Wilson Museum's main hall from May 27th through September 30th.

 

In Great Deeds, Something Abides

From 2011 to 2015, the United States marks the 150th anniversary of the Civil War. To commemorate the Sesquicentennial of this momentous event, which made its mark on Maine and Castine in ways large and small, the Wilson Museum presents two Civil War exhibits. The Museum's exhibits are one of 23 stops on the new Maine Civil War Trail, which opens in the spring of 2013. The title of an exhibit in the Museum's main hall "In Great Deeds, Something Abides" was taken from the words of Joshua Chamberlain. Displayed in this exhibit is a wide array of artifacts, pictures and documents of local interest from the Museum's collections. 

  

The John Perkins House Shown in Mourning

hair wreathThe Wilson Museum's historic John Perkins House will honor a typical fallen soldier who was returned to his hometown to be buried. Inspiration for this exhibit is based on the untimely death of Lieutenant Charles Little Stevens who was mortally wounded at the siege of Port Hudson, Louisiana. Artifacts on display include Lt. Stevens's uniform buttons, epaulettes and even a lock of his hair. Visitors will be welcomed into the parlor to pay their last respects; a guided tour of the other rooms will show how the home may have been arranged to accommodate for this sad occasion and to provide space for the community's efforts to support its troops. The John Perkins House is open on Sundays and Wednesdays from 2-5 p.m. during July and August. Admission is $5 per person.

 

 

Events -

 

Storytelling Can Change Your Life

Stories can transport you to different times and places;
they can make you laugh or shed a tear; and they can
draw entire communities together. Once upon a time
(last September to be precise), Castine began
hosting some of the best storytellers in the country
for in-school classes, public performances and
how-to workshops. The extravaganza continues
and will culminate in a three-day festival entitled
Storytelling by the Sea August 16-18, 2013
featuring Tim Sample, Jennifer Armstrong,
Oscar Mokeme and many more. Follow the
storyteller icon below for more details about
this year's programs and events. 

Sept           Michael Parent
Oct             Iz Crain & LouAnna Perkins
                    Stephen Sanfilippo
Nov            Johanna Sweet
Dec            Donald Small, Johanna Sweet & George Bland, Jr.
Mar 1         Chris Van Dusen
Mar 21-22    Judith Black
Apr 11        Antonio Rocha
May 2-3    Jackson Gillman
Jun 4         Jo Radner
Jun 25      Hawk Henries
Jul 23       Stephen Sanfilippo
Aug 16-18 
    STORYTELLING BY THE SEA    
    featuring   Tim Sample
                        Jennifer Armstrong
                        Oscar Mokeme
                                          and more !

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chris Van D. and Mr. Magee

Chris Van Dusen storytelling iconAcclaimed children's author and illustrator Chris Van Dusen will speak at Witherle Memorial Library on Friday, March 1st at noon. Author of the Mr. Magee series, King Hugo's Huge Ego, Randy Riley's Really Big Hit, and more, Van Dusen will read from one of his many popular works and give an inside look at the creation of a book. Fun for the whole family! 

This program is part of the Storytelling Can Change Your Life series. Chris Van D. and Mr. Magee is funded by the Friends of the Witherle Memorial Library.

 

 

 

 

HOME Convention 

The Wilson Museum will once again take a booth at the Homeschoolers of Maine (HOME) Convention at the Samoset Resort in Rockport, March 14th - 16th. The HOME Convention three-day educational event draws home-school families from all across the state with more than 900 attendees last year alone.

This year the Museum's learning exhibit will incude a full-size replica of a Civil War soldier's tent to coincide with the Museum's involvement with the Maine Civil War Trail and the 150th anniversary of the American Civil War. Within the tent children will find reproduction personal items a soldier may have carried with him including bedding, eating utensils, a letter from home and a compass. A compass learning activity will send convention attendees on a fun scavenger hunt. For more information on the convention visit HOME's webpage

 

 

A World of Tales

Judith Blackstorytelling iconEnjoy a potpourri of family-friendly stories with storyteller Judith Black during A World of Tales, a performance at the Parish House of the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Castine, 86 Court Street on Thursday, March 21, 6 p.m.  From the love stories of our immigrant great grandmothers, to the wisdom of ancient folk lore and the hard-earned lessons taught to us by our children, these tales will have you laughing until your sides hurt and sighing in recognition of our shared human condition.

Judith Black is a professional storyteller with a national following, having been featured ten times at the National Storytelling Festival, and serving three times as Teller-in-residence at the International Storytelling Center in Jonesboro, TN.

This program is part of the Storytelling Can Change Your Life series. A World of Tales is funded in part by grants from: the Maine Arts Commission and New England States Touring, a program of the New England Foundation for the Arts and Friends of the Witherle Memorial Library.

 

 

Getting the Story off the Page

Judith Blackstorytelling iconHave you ever been moved by a story in print and retold it exactly as it was written, only to have it fall flat? Stories were traditionally passed on orally, but the invention of the printing press required that those stories be translated into the written word. In order to help a story become three dimensional once again, you must blow the life back into it. The public is invited to Getting the Story off the Page workshop at the Witherle Memorial Library, 41 School Street, Castine on Friday, March 22nd at 6 p.m. to learn storytelling skills.  Union 93 teachers will earn 2 contact hours for attending the event.  

Judith Black is a professional storyteller with a national following, having been featured ten times at the National Storytelling Festival, and serving three times as Teller-in-residence at the International Storytelling Center in Jonesboro, TN.

This program is part of the Storytelling Can Change Your Life seriesGetting the Story Off the Page is funded in part by grants from: the Maine Arts Commission and New England States Touring, a program of the New England Foundation for the Arts and Friends of the Witherle Memorial Library.

 

 

Poetry in Motion 

Antonio Rochastorytelling iconOn Thursday, April 11th at 6 p.m. in the Wilson Museum's Meeting Room at 112 Perkins Street, enjoy Poetry in Motion, a blend of Antonio Rocha's award-winning mime and storytelling. The evening will be filled with stories from different cultures and mime from his wild imagination. Antonio's eloquent movements, tenor voice, realistic sound effects and compelling stories will sooth your soul, tickle your funny bone and leave you spellbound. This is a performance you will be talking about for days!

Antonio Rocha, storyteller, mime and children's book author, began his career in the performing arts in 1985. Rocha's unique fusion of verbal narrative and mime have received several awards, and he's been invited to venues such as the National Storytelling Festival, The Kennedy Center, The Graz Festival in Austria, and many more in fourteen countries on six continents. For more information on Antonio Rocha http://www.storyinmotion.com/.

Poetry in Motion is part of the Storytelling Can Change Your Life series, a year-long effort to bring some of the best storytellers in the country to Castine.  

 

 

Family Cabaret 

Jackson Gillmanstorytelling iconOn May 2nd at 6 p.m., storyteller Jackson Gillman will present Family Cabaret at the Parish House of the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Castine, 86 Court Street. Gillman, aka the "Stand-Up Chameleon," will magically transform himself into a wide array of eccentric characters through his many talents as mime, actor, songsmith and storyteller. Family Cabaret is a fun look at daily rituals, wake-up to bedtime, from all perspectives, and is ideal for an intergenerational audience. All ages welcome!

Jackson Gillman has thrice been a featured performer at the National Storytelling Festival, and has performed at festivals and schools throughout the country. Whether performing on concert stages, at colleges, business functions, festivals, school assemblies, or libraries, Jackson Gillman delights his audiences with his inventions while touching them with his personal warmth. 

Family Cabaret is part of the Storytelling Can Change Your Life series, a year-long effort to bring some of the best storytellers in the country to Castine.  The program is funded in part by grants from: the Maine Arts Commission and New England States Touring, a program of the New England Foundation for the Arts and Wilson Museum.

 

 

Traveling the World through Myth and Story 

Johanna Sweetstorytelling iconFor centuries, people gathered around a captivating storyteller much the way we now gather around the television set. On Friday, May 31st at 6 p.m., the Wilson Museum in Castine will be the gathering place as Johanna Sweet weaves tales of myth and legend from around the world. Drawing from the Museum's exhibits, she will rekindle a storytelling tradition as ancient as humankind.

Johanna Sweet is a retired teacher of 33 years and has been a storyteller for 30 years. She is an avid gardener and loves sharing stories with schools and community groups. 

Traveling the World through Myth and Story is part of the Storytelling Can Change Your Life series, a year-long effort to bring some of the best storytellers in the country to Castine.

 

 

Braving the Middle Ground

Jo Radnerstorytelling iconWhat tales shaped New England identities in the 17th and 18th centuries? Storyteller and historian Jo Radner will provide some answers to this question during Braving the Middle Ground, a performance at the Wilson Museum on June 4th at 1 p.m.

English settlers and native peoples saw one another as defenders and trespassers, pursuers and refugees, relatives and aliens, kind neighbors and ruthless destroyers. During her performance, Radner will reveal this complex colonial "middle ground," juxtaposing Native American oral traditions and stories told by her own New England ancestors.

Jo Radner has fifteen years of experience performing at festivals, conferences, and community events. She holds a BA, MA, and PhD from Harvard University, and has published books on early Irish history, contemporary Anglo-Irish drama, and women's folklore.

This program is part of the Storytelling Can Change Your Life series

 


Mystery Table Runner Workshop 

mystery runner Love puzzles and mysteries and like to quilt?  Join the staff of the Wilson Museum in the Meeting Room at 112 Perkins Street on Tuesday, June 11th from 1 - 4 p.m., for a Mystery Table Runner Workshop.  The mystery story is in seven chapters and begins with a prologue including a list of squares and triangles to cut and bring to the workshop as well as a list of supplies and equipment needed.  Each succeeding chapter will offer clues and instructions for creating a table runner.  This project is small enough to complete in an afternoon, easy enough for beginners and mysterious enough for experienced quilters.  Cost for the workshop is $15 per person.  Call 207-326-9247 or email info@wilsonmuseum.org for more information or to sign up and receive the prologue and materials list.

 

 

A World of Music 

Hawk Henriesstorytelling iconStories are passed on, not only through the spoken word, but through music as well. Native American flute maker and musician Hawk Henries will perform A World of Music at the Wilson Museum on Tuesday, June 25th at 3 p.m. Using music, stories and humor, Hawk will share his experiences and perspectives on life in hopes of acknowledging and honoring the sacredness of people from all cultures. He will play his handcrafted flutes as well as musicial instruments from around the world.

Hawk Henries is a member of the Chaubunagungamaug band of Nipmuck, a people indigenous to what is now Southern New England. He has been composing original music and making Eastern Woodlands flutes for more than twenty-two years.  Learn more about Hawk Henries on his website.

This program is part of the Storytelling Can Change Your Life series.

 

 

Two Pieces of Puzzle 

Rosamond ReaOn June 26th, 2 p.m. at the Wilson Museum, explore puzzles from two angles. First, renowned puzzle historian Anne Williams will give a presentation Par, the Rolls-Royce of Jigsaw Puzzles, and Its Place in History. She will trace the evolution of the puzzle from its origins as an educational toy in the 1700s, to its full flourishing in the mid-twentieth century. Par Company Ltd., founded in 1931, made high-end hand-crafted and customized jigsaw puzzles for the rich and famous for many decades. Its clientele included presidents, industrial magnates, and Hollywood celebrities, as well as middle class aficionados who rented Par puzzles by the week. Examples of these hand-cut wooden puzzles collected by Ellenore Wilson Doudiet are on exhibit this summer in the Museum's main hall.

Then, puzzle hobbyist Rosamond Rea will teach participants how wooden jigsaw puzzles are made. Beginning with a piece of raw plywood she will demonstrate the steps from start to finish. Participants will have an opportunity to try cutting puzzle pieces using a scroll saw and will be introduced to the tools and materials required.

Anne Williams, recognized today as the leading historian of jigsaw puzzles, is retired after a teaching career at Bates College and the University of Pennsylvania. She has authored two books, several exhibition catalogs, and many articles on the history of jigsaw puzzles.

Rosamond Rea holds an M.A. in History Museum Studies from the Cooperstown Graduate Program. Now retired, Roz began cutting traditional wooden jigsaw puzzles in 2012. Blending her love of history and fine craftsmanship with a fascination for the puzzle-cutting craft, Rosamond enjoys experimenting with her scroll saw at her home in Bar Harbor, ME.

 

 

Princess Ana and B 

Princess Ana and BOn Sunday, June 30th at 3 p.m. meet author Barbara McKee and artist Barbara Mallonee for a presentation and book signing at the Wilson Museum in Castine. While Barbara McKee was serving in Honduras, she noticed that many schools had no books. So, she and some of her artist friends created four bi-lingual storybook coloring books to give away to Honduran children. Her latest book, Princess Ana and B, illustrated by Barbara Mallonee, is about a down-to-earth princess who helps her friends learn to read. Princess Ana will be delivered to Honduras next year. In the meantime, attendees can purchase their own copies of the book and have it signed by the author and the illustrator.

Barbara McKee, a mother and grandmother, has found a way to combine her talents with a love of other cultures cultivated over the years. Barbara and her husband have served in the Peace Corps in Brazil and hosted 18 exchange students. For the past 13 years Barbara has served in remote villages of Honduras with the Central American Medical Outreach as "Gift Lady" with the Dental Team.

Barbara Mallonee has a BFA degree from Wichita State University and has exhibited extensively throughout Kansas. In 1999 she was an "Artist in Residence" at the International School of Art in Montecastello, Umbria, Italy. As a part-time resident of Castine Maine, she has shared her art and techniques with the Castine Arts Association, Castine Historical Society and the Wilson Museum. 

 

 

The Swordfish Hunters 

Bruce BourqueArchaeologist and Professor of Anthropology Bruce Bourque will give a presentation and sign copies of his book The Swordfish Hunters: the History and Ecology of an Ancient American Sea People on Tuesday, July 2nd at the Wilson Museum. In the late 1800s many ancient stone tools were discovered in pits filled with a red powder called red ochre. These were ancient graves of a people who popularly became known as the Red Paint People, though academically the culture is referred to as the Moorehead Burial Tradition or the Moorehead Phase of the Laurentian Tradition. It is fascinating to learn that scientists have determined that this maritime hunter-gatherer society hunted swordfish, a dangerous and elusive prey, when more easily procured fish were abundant. How they arrived at this theory is the subject of Professor Bourque's book and his presentation. He will weave together the story of the ancient Red Paint People with the evolution of scientific research methods since the late nineteenth century. Moorehead Burial Tradition artifacts from the Wilson Museum's collection will be on display during the event.

Bruce Bourque teaches anthropology at Bates College and serves as the staff archaeologist at the Maine State Museum. He became interested in Maine's famous Red Paint People as a graduate student and has conducted archaeological research focusing on Penobscot Bay since the 1970s. The results of that research played a key role in his new book The Swordfish Hunters.  

 

 

Fireside Cooking 

Ellenore Tarr fireside cookingAs you punch in the seconds on the microwave oven in your twenty-first century kitchen, have you ever wondered how our ancestors cooked in large open fireplaces and what kinds of foods they prepared?  The kitchen of the John Perkins House will be the venue for such wonder when fireside cooking is demonstrated on: July 10th, July 17th, July 24th, August 7th, August 14th, and August 21st, from 2-5 p.m.   The John Perkins House is located at 120 Perkins Street in Castine and is part of the Wilson Museum campus.  Guided tours of the John Perkins House are $5 per person; visitors will enjoy some tasty morsels from the day's fare.

2008 fireside cooking

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

magnifying glassDiscovery Days: Who Were Civil War Zouaves? 

Rob KufrovichBaggy red pants and a turban may seem like a strange outfit for an American Civil War soldier, but that was the uniform often worn by zouaves, soldiers whose appearance and fighting style were inspired by French North African regiments of the same name. Learn more about these unique soldiers during a family-friendly Discovery Days program on Thursday, July 11th, 2-3:30 p.m. Civil War reenactor Rob Kufrovich will introduce you to the uniform, equipment, and everyday experiences of a zouave soldier. Handle reproduction artifacts and have a chance to explor a Civil War soldier's tent!

A man of many talents, Rob Kufrovich has worked as a chemical lab analyst, an underground mining geologist, a professional musician, an artist, and a science and social studies teacher. He currently works as a classroom education technician in the third and fourth grade classroom at Castine's Adams School. Rob has been interested in the Civil War for many years and has participated in Civil War reenactments since 2000. He is currently a member of Richardson's Civil War Roundtable in Searsport.

Discovery Days programs are designed for families with children ages 12 and under. The cost for each program is $3 per person or $12 per family of four or more participating members. Ensure your participation by contacting 326-9247, or info@wilsonmuseum.org to pre-register and pay for the program.

 

 

Col. Charles W. Tilden and the 16th Maine at Gettysburg 

Charles W. TildenMaine's history of Gettysburg, until now, has been defined by Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain and the 20th Maine. On Monday, July 15th at 3 p.m. historian Mark Honey will reveal a "new" face in Maine's contribution to the Battle of Gettysburg. Mark's research and presentation focuses on Col. Charles W. Tilden, a codfish merchant from Castine, to whom Chamberlain, himself, paid homage in 1898.

Mark Honey, a local historian and author with family ties in the Castine area, resides in Ellsworth.

 

 

 

 

 

 

magnifying glassDiscovery Days: Remembering Gettysburg 

Rob KufrovichGettysburg is perhaps the best known battle of the Civil War, but what was it like to actually fight in this confrontation? On Thursday, July 18th, 2-3:30 p.m. join Civil War reenactor Rob Kufrovich for a family-friendly program as he explores the battle of Gettysburg through the eyes of a zouzve soldier. Afterward, you'll continue to develop your understanding of a soldier's life as you learn about hardtack - a mixture of flour and water hardened to a rocklike consistency - which was commonly used during the Civil War. Discover why soldiers often had to eat this teeth shattering cracker, and make your own hardtack dough to take home!

A man of many talents, Rob Kufrovich has worked as a chemical lab analyst, an underground mining geologist, a professional musician, an artist, and a science and social studies teacher. He currently works as a classroom education technician in the third and fourth grade classroom at Castine's Adams School. Rob has been interested in the Civil War for many years and has participated in Civil War reenactments since 2000. He is currently a member of Richardson's Civil War Roundtable in Searsport.

Discovery Days programs are designed for families with children ages 12 and under. The cost for each program is $3 per person or $12 per family of four or more participating members. Ensure your participation by contacting 326-9247, or info@wilsonmuseum.org to pre-register and pay for the program.

 

 

Concert: Castine Town Band 

Castine Town Band drumThe picturesque grounds of the Wilson Museum on Perkins Street, on the shore of Castine Harbor, will be the location of an outdoor concert by the Castine Town Band, Friday, July 19th, at 6 p.m. Bring a chair or blanket and enjoy this free concert!

In the late nineteenth century Castine's Town Band was a proud contributor to patriotic events and summer evening entertainments. Revived in 1998 by a group of like-minded musicians, by 2004, the Band was recognized as one of the top four municipal bands in Maine. Membership in the Band is open to players of all ages and talent. It is a fine blend of locals, retirees and summer people who have a common interest - playing in the Town Band.

As an agent for connecting the past to the present, the Museum is proud to host the Castine Town Band.

In case of rain, concert will be at Emerson Hall, Court Street.

 

 

Nailed to the Mast: Naval Songs of the Civil War 

Stephen SanfilippoOn Tuesday, July 23 at 3 p.m. in the Wilson Museum, 120 Perkins Street, Castine, enjoy "Nailed to the Mast," an offering of historic naval songs of the Union and Confederacy. The program will concentrate on the men of four well-known ships and two well-known battles: the CSS Alabama and the USS Kearsarge during their battle of Cherbourg, France in 1864; and the USS Monitor and the CSS Virginia (Merrimac) in the Battle of Hampton Roads in 1862. These songs describe the battles, but more importantly they give voice to the men who fought in the War and, in the case of the USS Cumberland, sank with their flag nailed to the mast.

Stephen Sanfilippo, a retired secondary and undergraduate history teacher, is a nationally recognized researcher and performer of historic songs of the sea. He holds a Ph.D. in history from Stony Brook University. Dr. Sanfilippo and his wife devide their time between Southold, New York and Pembroke, Maine.

This program is offered free of charge as part of the Storytelling Can Change Your Life series, a year-long effort to bring some of the best storytellers in the country to Castine. The series is co-sponsored by the Wilson Museum, the Witherle Memorial Library, Friends of the Witherle Memorial Library, Adams School, Castine Arts Association, and Castine Historical Society.   

 

 

magnifying glassDiscovery Days: A Portrait Tells a Story, Part I 

Elise AndréaAs the old saying goes, a picture is worth a thousand words. A portrait is no different. On July 25th and August 1st, 2-3:30 p.m., bring the family for a two-part portrait painting workshop. On the first day, watch a demonstration with artist Elise Andréa and begin to "tell" your own story through an introductory drawing lesson. Return on August 1st to put paint to paper and create your own portrait. Participants may attend one or both parts of the workshop.

Elise Andréa is an artist whose work has been included in many Vermont exhibitions and has won numerous awards. She has given watercolor lessons and/or workshops in Maine, Vermont, New York, New Jersey, North Carolina, Michigan, and New Zealand. She will be demonstrating and offering classes in watercolor painting and basket-making in the Barn at the Wilson Museum during July and August.

Discovery Days programs are designed for families with children ages 12 and under. The cost for each program is $3 per person or $12 per family of four or more participating members. Ensure your participation by contacting 326-9247, or info@wilsonmuseum.org to pre-register and pay for the program.

 

 

Castine Plein Air Festival

plein air artistsThis summer, the town of Castine's natural beauty and quintessential New England charm will be the focus of the 2013 Castine Plein Air Festival put on by the Castine Arts Association. The Wilson Museum's campus will be one of the picturesque sites offered to the painters. The one-day art festival will take place on Saturday, July 27th and will feature 35 artists who will spend the day capturing the scenic beauty of Castine in magnificent plein air paintings. The event will culminate that evening in a public exhibition and sale of all artwork created by the artists during the day. All proceeds from the sale of art will go toward the Castine Schoodic Sculpture Fund along with continuing the activities of the Castine Arts Association supporting the arts within the community.

 

 

 

magnifying glassDiscovery Days: A Portrait Tells a Story, Part II 

Stover Perkins portraitJoin artist Elise Andréa on Thursday, August 1st, 2-3:30 p.m. for the second of her two part portrait painting workshop. Watch a demonstration, and then put paint to paper and create your own portrait. Whether you came to the first workshop or not, we want you for this one!

Elise Andréa is an artist whose work has been included in many Vermont exhibitions and has won numerous awards. She has given watercolor lessons and/or workshops in Maine, Vermont, New York, New Jersey, North Carolina, Michigan, and New Zealand. She will be demonstrating and offering classes in watercolor painting and basket-making in the Barn at the Wilson Museum during July and August.

Discovery Days programs are designed for families with children ages 12 and under. The cost for each program is $3 per person or $12 per family of four or more participating members. Ensure your participation by contacting 326-9247, or info@wilsonmuseum.org to pre-register and pay for the program.

 

 

Civil War Reenactment: 20th Maine, Company B

20th Maine, Company BOn Saturday and Sunday, August 3rd and 4th, from 10 a.m to 5 p.m., experience the sights, smells and sounds of the Civil War at the Wilson Museum in Castine. Throughout the weekend, a team of reenactors will eat, sleep and live as though it's the 1860s, recreating a 20th Maine, Company B campsite on the Museum's picturesque grounds overlooking Castine Harbor. The program will include drills, marches, and informal lectures.

The original Company B was mustered into the 20th Regiment, Maine Volunteer Infantry, in August of 1862. At Gettysburg, Company B was sent out as skirmishers by Colonel Chamberlain to protect the regiment's exposed left flank and was instrumental in routing the fleeing Confederates. Company B was with the 20th in all its battles, from the Wilderness to Petersburg to Appomattox.

The Company B reenactors, a living history group dedicated to preserving the memory of Maine Civil War volunteers, consists of men and women from all over the state of Maine. Their goal is to provide the public with activities that are enjoyable, educational and, above all, safe.

The reenactment is free and open to the public. During the weekend, the Museum will be open during its regularly scheduled hours: 2-5 p.m. 

 

 

magnifying glassDiscovery Days: Cave Art

cave drawingExperience the beauty of ancient art during Discovery Days: Cave Art, a family-friendly program on Thursday, August 8, 2-3:30 p.m. Learn about the evolution of artistic expression from Homo erectus to Homo sapiens, view stone tools that are nearly 500,000 years old, and make your own version of cave art!

This program is cosponsored by the Witherle Memorial Library as part of the Library's summer reading program Dig into Reading and was developed with the assistance of Dr. Riva Berleant.

Discovery Days programs are designed for families with children ages 12 and under. The cost for each program is $3 per person or $12 per family of four or more participating members. Ensure your participation by contacting 326-9247, or info@wilsonmuseum.org to pre-register and pay for the program.

 

Deer Isle's Undefeated American's Cup Crews

20th Maine, Company BOn Tuesday, August 13th at 3 p.m., Mark Gabrielson will give a presentation and sign copies of his new book Deer Isle’s Undefeated America’s Cup Crews: Humble Heroes From a Downeast Island. Mark Gabrielson tells the story, well-known on Deer Isle, of the crews who were recruited by the New York Yacht Club to sail the big America’s Cup cutters in the late 1800s. Affectionately known as the “Deer Isle Boys”, these men are heroes to all Deer Islers, many of whom are direct descendants. Despite their local fame, Mark found that there was no well-researched, book-length version of their story. Deer Isles’s Undefeated American’s Cup Crews rectifies this omission magnificently.

Mark J. Gabrielson was educated at Princeton. After a 33-year business career, he is now a graduate student at Harvard University, in Extension, concentrating in history. Mark is also a research intern at the US Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island; a Trustee of the Marion to Bermuda Cruising Yacht Race; and a US Coast Guard licensed Master in the Merchant Marine. He and his wife Betsy base their Hinckley Sou’wester 50 yawl ‘Lyra’ in Deer Isle and sail New England and Bermuda waters.

 

 

magnifying glassDiscovery Days: Curious Chucky

Curious ChuckyAuthor Jean Miller and illustrator David Dolittle have written a picture book about an inquisitive young woodchuck named Chucky. Curious? If so, come listen to the story Curious Chucky on Thursday, August 15th, 2-3:30 p.m. Following the reading, meet the author and enjoy a book-themed activity.

Jean Miller is a graduate of the University of New Hampshire and Northeastern University and wrote a natural foods cookbook for her Master's thesis. She and her husband currently divide their time between Castine and Arizona.

David Dolittle received his BFA from the Rhode Island School of Design and has completed projects for the Rogers Williams Park Zoo and the Harvard Museum of Natural History. His work has been exhibited at several well-known venues around the world, including the National Science Foundation in Washington, DC and the Gelman Gallery in Providence, Rhode Island.

Discovery Days programs are designed for families with children ages 12 and under. The cost for each program is $3 per person or $12 per family of four or more participating members. Ensure your participation by contacting 326-9247, or info@wilsonmuseum.org to pre-register and pay for the program.

 

Storytelling by the Sea

storytelling iconLike a drum major leading an exuberant parade, Maine humorist Tim Sample will kick off the Storytelling by the Sea festival on Friday afternoon, August 16th, at 1 p.m. on the picturesque grounds of the Wilson Museum on the shore of Castine Harbor.

Storytelling by the Sea festival is the culmination of a year-long storytelling series entitled Storytelling Can Change Your Life sponsored by many Castine community organizations and several granting agencies. Storyteller Jennifer Armstrong will act as MC throughout the three-day festival (Aug. 16-18) as well as telling a tale or two herself. Other storytellers will include John MacDonald, Frank Gotwals, Oscar Mokeme, and many more. See the list below. Food and vendors both Friday and Saturday.

Tickets for Storytelling by the Sea festival are $10 per person per day or buy a pass for the entire festival for $18. Children 12 and under are $5 per person per day or $8 for a full festival pass. Advance tickets may be purchased at the Wilson Museum or the Witherle Memorial Library.

Storytellers featured in Storytelling by the Sea include:

Tim SampleTim Sample is widely acknowledged to be New England's premier native humorist. Novelist Stephen King has likened Sample's work to that of Mark Twain; and Charles Kuralt called him "Maine's humorist laureate." Tim's albums, DVD's and videos (including four albums and a video for the Bert and I company) have sold well over a million copies. He's written and/or illustrated over a dozen books and over his eleven years as a regular correspondent on CBS Sunday Morning, brought Maine and his own brand of humor to the country at large.

Jennifer ArmstrongJennifer Armstrong tells traditional and personal stories from her Celtic-American heritage and plays the Scottish bagpipe, fiddle, banjo and guitar. She believes in audience participation and community celetrations, and she is a creative facilitator and performer, and is MC for the festival.

LouAnna PerkinsLouAnna Perkins grew up listening to stories told by her mother and grandmother. She plays music and tells stories with her sister and mother (The Crain Sisters) at schools and other venues in California, Maine and wherever they can. A staff attorney for Maine Farmland Trust and Trustee of the Wilson Museum, LouAnna divides her time between Penobscot, Maine (telling stories with her grandchildren) and Homosassa, Florida (gathering new ideas for more stories!).

Oscar MokemeOscar Mokeme is the Founder and Executive Director of the Museum of African Culture in Portland, Maine. He has spent most of his adult life collecting, preserving and interpreting African humanistic art. Mokeme comes from a long lineage of Igbo Royal family healer practitioners called "Umu-dibia" and has been named a Traditional Healer by the Maine Arts Commission where he was awarded the Jefferson Award for Cultural Diversity in the State of Maine. He offers workshops and presentations which blend traditions and have touched millions of people worldwide.

Frank GotwalsFrank Gotwals is a singer-songwriter from Stonington, Maine who has been performing his subtle blend of folk and jazz for more than 25 years. Resonant baritone vocals and a strong guitar technique combined with a dry sense of humor have made him an increasingly popular performer on east coast stages. His thought provoking, sometimes humorous songs, often include images and ideas from his coastal home where he has been a commercial lobster fisherman for many years. His first solo CD, Dry Ice, was released in 1994 and he has recently released a second CD, Unfamiliar Sea.

Johanna SweetJohanna Sweet, a teacher for over 33 years, has been a storyteller for 30 years. Currently, she is an avid gardener and loves sharing stories with schools and community groups. She often performs traditional stories from around the world for both children and adults.

Joe SlocumJoe Slocum, a dedicated product of the 60s, is a lawyer, hot air balloon pilot, passionate music and art lover, registered Maine Guide, writer, environmentalist and avid outdoor enthusiast. For the past six years he has served as Belfast's City Manager. In the 1980s Joe started following his grandmother's storytelling tradition based upon the inspiration and support of his two wonderful children: Emily & Ben. All of his stories are original and he tells them in a broad variety of venues.

WendiLou SalmanWendiLou Salman grew up listening to and telling stories with her mother (LouAnna Perkins) and grandmother (Iz Crain). She carries on the tradition, making storytelling a centerpiece of her home-based nursery school program in Penobscot and an important part of the homeschooling experience for her two children.

Stephen SanfilippoStephen Sanfilippo received his Ph.D. in History from Stony Brook University. He has taught history for over 30 years at the secondary and undergraduate levels, and has lectured and presented academic papers for many institutions. He has been performing traditional songs of the sea for 40 years at historic venues throughout coastal New York and New England, and from Prince Edward Island to the Eastern Caribbean. His performances, featuring a good dose of historical fact, work best for an adult audience.

Sage CollinsSage Collins, a fourth generation Mainer, was born in Blue Hill and attended schools there through high school. He has been in the land surveying business since the late 1960s and has had his own surveying business since 1979. A natural storyteller, Sage is looking forward to sharing his tales of life in Maine.

Harry KaiserianHarry Kaiserian, a retired Navy Commander, is a resident of Castine, a weekly food columnist and teacher of cooking classes. A life-long learner and traveller, Harry picks up stories wherever he goes.

 

Margery Read graduated from Columbia University's Masters of Library Science program where she specialized in children's library services. She immediately went to work in graduate school libraries of medicine and science. After she and her husband moved to Maine in 1976, Margery turned her hand to many different things, but she never forgot her interest in stories and getting young children to read. When her own four children began attending the Adams School in Castine, she volunteered as a storyteller every Tuesday, reading and telling stories to all of the grades. She has told stories to both children and adults at the Bangor and Portland Public Libraries as well as George Stevens Academy Arts Fest and Witherle Memorial Library.

Hope LewisHope Lewis, a retired teacher, is a storyteller and fiber artist from Seal Cove, Maine. She enjoys creating original stories, but also savors performing tales from a wide variety of traditions. Her stories are crafted to appeal to the entire family. Her repertoire includes wisdom stories, traditional folklore and environmentally conscious stories. She enjoys telling tales in Acadia National Park during the summer.

Donald SmallDonald Small was a mechanical engineer, teaching for 30 years at Maine Maritime Academy. Four years ago he joined a Castine writers group and has been writing memoirs, short stories, poems and travelogues. His first public performance was last December as part of Castine's Storytelling Can Change Your Life series.

John MacDonaldJohn MacDonald is a professional storyteller who has been performing and entertaining audiences in small towns and big cities throughout New England for decades. He is the author of several books including Maine Trivia, A Moose and a Lobster Walk into a Bar and Down the Road a Piece: A Storyteller's Guide to Maine. John is the founder of the Maine Storyteller Festival. He writes a weekly humor column that is published in many Maine newspapers and his talk show can be heard each weekend on WGAN in Portland.

Jude LambJude Lamb is an artist, writer and storyteller who often performs as her great-great-great-great grandmother, Eunice Lakeman Hoar. In 1817 Eunice and her husband, Luther, and their nine children were the first white settlers on what is now Rangeley Lake. Jude tells of the family’s dramatic journey, on foot, over the late winter snow. As Lamb family historian and genealogist, her goal is to bring to life family stories and inspire others to pass down family tales in creative forms. She is a member of LOONS (Lovers of Old & New Stories), LANES (League for the Advancement of New England Storytelling), and the National Storytelling Network.

David Avery holds a Ph.D. in biological oceanography and has published several papers on zooplankton resistance to toxic algae. He teaches mathematics and science at Maine Maritime Academy. For the festival he will be playing the role of Rev. Edward T. Taylor (1793-1871), better known as Father Taylor, the pastor of Boston's Seamen's Bethel and one of the city's most popular preachers during the 1830s-1850s. Taylor's sermon was researched and prepared by Wendy Knickerbocker, a former academic librarian and, currently, Trustee of the Witherle Memorial Library. Wendy has written a book on Father Taylor that will be published in 2014.

Keep an eye on this site for more storytellers and information.

 

 

 

magnifying glassDiscovery Days: Follow the Drinking Gourd big dipper

The drinking gourd is another name for the big dipper, a beacon for many slaves escaping to freedom in the nineteenth century. On Thursday, August 22nd 2-3:30 p.m., listen to the story Follow the Drinking Gourd, a tale about an abolitionist named Peg Leg Joe and the song he teaches to slaves. Following the reading, handle objects similar to those used by slaves, and listen to a CD of slave lullabies.

Discovery Days programs are designed for families with children ages 12 and under. The cost for each program is $3 per person or $12 per family of four or more participating members. Ensure your participation by contacting 326-9247, or info@wilsonmuseum.org to pre-register and pay for the program.

 

Greetings from Castine

postcardBetween the Civil War and World War I, Castine became a popular summer resort on the Maine coast. The natural beauty of its peninsula setting, a fascination with its early history, and the charm of its old buildings attracted visitors to its hotels and cottages season after season. This golden era of tourism is vividly captured in vintage post cards, which depict period scenes of the waterfront, village streets, homes, churches, public buildings, and historic sites. On Thursday, August 22nd at 3 p.m., State Historian Earle G. Shettleworth, Jr. will give a PowerPoint presentation based on post cards from the collections of the Maine Historic Preservation Commission and the Penobscot Marine Museum.

Earle G. Shettleworth, Jr., a Portland native, became interested in historic preservation due to the destruction of Portland’s Union Station in 1961. In 1964 he became a member of the committee which founded Greater Portland Landmarks. Since 1971 he has served on the board, was appointed the architectural historian, and then the director of the Maine Historic Preservation Commission. Most recently, Mr. Shettleworth has served two terms as State Historian.

 

WILSON MUSEUM
Open: May 27 - September 30
Weekdays 10 am - 5 pm, Saturday & Sunday 2 - 5 pm
John Perkins House BulletDemonstrations
July - August, Wednesday & Sunday, 2 - 5 pm
Group visits can be arranged by appointment.
(207) 326-9247   info@wilsonmuseum.org
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Admission is free, except for the John Perkins House,
where there are guided tours on the hour.
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